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Six amazing infographics reveal what London’s really like

Posted at 2:30 pm, October 22, 2014 in News

 

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A few fun facts for you stats fans: residents in Enfield are way happier than those in Hammersmith, Clapham is a great place to pull, and Islington (with a birth rate that’s way below average) is a great place to live if you want to avoid babies.

We love a good infographic, and James Cheshire and Oliver Uberti’s book ‘The Information Capital’ has some fantastic ones brimming full of great London stats. First up is the bright swirly image above which tells us that in 2012 Londoners watched nearly twice as many theatre performances as music gigs, and for every 100,000 of us we watched just 35 dance shows.

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Now for the serious stuff, this is a life or death situation. The recorded number of deaths in Tower Hamlets, Islington, Barking and Dagenham are way above average. In Barking and Dagenham the above-average birth rates balance this out but birth rates in Islington and Tower Hamlets are below average.

What do we learn from this infographic? 1. People in Barking are so fertile just holding hands may impregnate them. 2. If you’re a mum-to-be looking for a new parent hangout head to Waltham Forest, Barking and Dagenham. 3. Not many people die in Kensington and Chelsea.

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 ‘If both members of a couple have median London salaries and have been able to save their mortgage deposit – or can withdraw it from ‘the bank of Mum and Dad’ – then spending £250,000 on a first flat would be reasonable. This is half the average house price in London (as of January 2014) and the same as the UK average.’

Not to be a neg-bomber, but what this map tells us is that unless you’re in a seriously well paid job or you’re royalty (which is kind of the same), then don’t bother house hunting in central London. Central London is a no-go-zone with no properties being sold for less than £250,000. No surprises there then. The black areas indicate houses sold for £250,000, and as the colour cools from bright red to greeny yellow the price decreases.

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Ah there we go, a simple smiley infographic showing how happy Londoners are. Oh, hang on, only people living in Kensington and Chelsea are satisfied with their lives? And they say that money doesn’t buy happiness.

What does this infographic teach us? Firstly, if you’re feeling depressed for god’s sake steer clear of Islington; people there are sad, really anxious, feel their everyday lives aren’t worthwhile and are generally seriously dissatisfied. Try Bromley, or Barnet.

That laid-back, smiley yellow face on the left shows how the majority of everyone else in the UK is pretty content with their lives *packs bags*.

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On first glance this one may look like an obvious ‘as we get older more of us get married and divorced’ graph, but upon further inspection it shows some pretty interesting facts; those of us who are separated or divorced tend to group up around Tottenham, while married folk cluster around the edges of the city.

What do we learn here? If you’re out on the pull avoid Highbury and Peckham, try Hoxton or Clapham. Or Tottenham if you don’t mind things getting complicated.

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This final infographic shows the scarily real correlation between binge drinking and injury-related 999 calls. It’s surely no coincidence that as binge drinking increases during the summer months, so does the number of knife injuries and gunshots.

What do we learn? When we’re boozing in a beer garden next summer it may be best to avoid Lambeth.

By Laura Sagar

These infographics were taken from ‘The Information Capital’ by James Cheshire and Oliver Uberti, soon to be released by Particular Books.

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